Ren ng stanford dissertation

Time and again, though, it troubled Ng that his images always lacked that certain something, that ideal blend of focus, depth of field and exposure present in the most satisfying pictures. Leaping ahead in a crowded field Lytro is not alone in championing the virtues of computational photography — basically any system where programming is used to reconstruct the final image — for the mass market. Windows software is planned, but for now there are likely to be a lot of disappointed Windows users as they unwrap their Lytro pre-order cameras later this week. Terms of use. Video could also be turned from a weakness of Lytro — their first camera has no video capability — to a strength. As it turns out, beyond a certain threshold, those millions upon millions of pixels amount to overkill for all but the most extreme photographic needs. And so, Ren Ng set out to solve the problem. The Lytro is the first camera that frees people from the need to focus before taking a picture, allowing them to later select any point in the photograph as the center of focus, and to refocus at will ever after. As graduate student at Stanford engineering, Ren Ng loved to climb rocks and he loved photography. The first is the broad explosion in digital sensor resolution. While it seems unlikely Adobe will actually build a camera, count on it to begin to add more elements of computational photography into Photoshop over time. The option of filming and focusing later would be incredibly freeing for both videographers and especially cinematographers. He wrote a doctoral thesis that earned best dissertation recognition from the Association of Computer Machinery.

As it turns out, beyond a certain threshold, those millions upon millions of pixels amount to overkill for all but the most extreme photographic needs. From there, mathematics takes over.

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Asked to place a finger on the crucial difference in getting his company off the ground, Ng laid credit precisely at the doorstep of the Stanford School of Engineering. Becoming Lytro The Lytro looks unassuming enough.

Lytro believes that its designs are immune to diffraction limits and mostly immune to the noise typically associated with high resolution — because the pixel values are added together in processing. While it seems unlikely Adobe will actually build a camera, count on it to begin to add more elements of computational photography into Photoshop over time.

Reinventing the lens In the process of trying to reinvent the camera, Ng has found a way to potentially reinvent the economics of creating cameras and lenses — a strategy that in the long run is a lot more likely to make Lytro money than selling their own cameras.

Ren ng stanford dissertation

The Lytro is made possible by two advances in the industry. It is all in the sensor and in the mathematics.

Using algorithms, Lytro has an infinite ability to compute and re-compute images, each one with its own point of focus. It is a sleek square tube of colorful anodized aluminum and rubber. Video could also be turned from a weakness of Lytro — their first camera has no video capability — to a strength. As graduate student at Stanford engineering, Ren Ng loved to climb rocks and he loved photography. While Ren Ng, the brilliant and charismatic founder and CEO of Lytro, gushes as much or more than anyone else about its first product, his vision for the company goes far beyond creating a new consumer gadget launched into a crowded marketplace. While it seems unlikely Adobe will actually build a camera, count on it to begin to add more elements of computational photography into Photoshop over time. With conventional camera and lens design, diffraction rears its ugly head long before reaching that resolution. In addition to the obvious weight, cost, and space savings of no longer needing focusing optics in the lens, light field cameras can perform corrections for aberrations in their image reconstruction software This will allow even high-end models to potentially have much less expensive lenses.
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Lytro: Why it might succeed in spite of its lackluster camera